Power of One

Blog Post by:

Rev. Dr. Craig M. Howard
Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy
Transitional Leader
choward@glpby.org


Today we celebrate the 500th year of the reformation. On October 31 in 1517, Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses on the church door. Luther’s work was the result of personal struggle with what it means to be righteous with God, and struggle with the Catholic church over the sale of indulgences. These indulgences were a way to purchase grace. The more a person paid, the more grace they received. Luther had enough of this corrupt practice, along with others, and the 95 thesis is the result.

What is amazing is that one person was able to break open the most powerful institutions of that time. Luther’s actions ushered in a protest movement, that became the protest-ant church. I recognize that Luther wasn’t the first person to push back against the Catholic church (Joan of Arc, John Huss and John Wycliffe are some examples), nor was he the only strong reformer (Ulrich Zwingli and John Calvin come to mind). But Martin Luther exercised power. This one person lit the fires of the reformation. He is an example of what one person can do with imagination, organization, and a willingness to act.

Power is often shunned by ministers and faithful Christians because it is seen as negative or destructive. In reality, power is neutral. It can be used for good and used by those with honest and righteous purpose. In the challenging book, You’re More Powerful Than You Think: A Citizen’s Guide to Making Change Happen, Eric Liu believes we are again living in an age when one person can make a huge difference. However, this person must learn to utilize citizen power; They must learn to imagine, organize, and take action. He writes, “Citizen power is about identify and action in the collective: how we make change happen together.” He writes the book “for people who want to be change agents, not defenders of the status quo.”

Some believe another reformation is needed to shake the church out of its rut, and put it back on course to be God’s deliverer of the gospel. Perhaps the next Martin (or Marsha) Luther is among us now. If so, they would be wise to become literate in the use of power; including the power of the Holy Spirit as well as how to organize people for action. May we all sing the hymn, “Here I am Lord, is it I Lord?”

Rev. Craig M. Howard

 

 

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